Craft

 

“What I adore is supreme professionalism.  I’m bored by writers who can write only when it’s raining.”–Noel Coward

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Mark (1978 – 1979) by Chuck Close, acrylic on canvas. Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, New York.

Mark took Close fourteen months to complete and was constructed from a series of airbrushed layers that imitated CMYK color printing.

American photographer and painter Chuck Close explains the importance of discipline and routine in the artistic process when he shares his advice to novice artists, “The advice I like to give young artists, or really anybody who’ll listen to me, is not to wait around for inspiration. Inspiration is for amateurs; the rest of us just show up and get to work. If you wait around for the clouds to part and a bolt of lightning to strike you in the brain, you are not going to make an awful lot of work. All the best ideas come out of the process; they come out of the work itself. Things occur to you. If you’re sitting around trying to dream up a great art idea, you can sit there a long time before anything happens. But if you just get to work, something will occur to you and something else will occur to you and something else that you reject will push you in another direction. Inspiration is absolutely unnecessary and somehow deceptive. You feel like you need this great idea before you can get down to work, and I find that’s almost never the case.”

The craft pages of our site house resources and links to help inspire any writer’s practice, so you don’t have to wait for inspiration to strike.

ON THE CRAFT OF FICTION ON THE CRAFT OF POETRY ON THE CRAFT OF DRAMA

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